Category Archives: Dual Credit High School courses

0353_Edviews.org_Are Dual-Credit Courses Helping Poor, Minority Students in Texas? – Aug. 10, 2018

Donna Jack
August 10, 2018

From below:

it is time to rethink the long-term goals of dual-credit programs and whether they have expanded too aggressively without maintaining the rigor students need to succeed in college.

____________________________

From: Donna Garner <wgarner1@hot.rr.com>
Sent: Friday, August 10, 2018 4:40 PM
To: Donna Garner <wgarner1@hot.rr.com>
Subject: EDVIEWS.ORG – ARE DUAL-CREDIT COURSES HELPING POOR, MINORITY STUDENTS IN TEXAS? – DMN – 8.10.18

8.10.18 – Dallas Morning News

 “Are Dual-Credit Courses Helping Poor, Minority Students in Texas?”
By Dallas Morning News Editorial Board

 https://www.dallasnews.com/opinion/editorials/2018/08/10/dual-credit-courses-helping-poor-minority-students-texas

 Excerpts from this article:

 …Dual-credit education programs were supposed to be one of those critical, difference-making strategies, allowing high school students — especially minority and low-income kids — to earn college credits. The idea was to inspire students who otherwise might not consider college, give students a chance to earn college credits earlier and cheaper, and ultimately increase college enrollment and completion rates.

Texas has been solidly behind these programs, eliminating a cap on the number of dual-credit courses a student may take and requiring that all school districts offer students the opportunity to earn the equivalent of at least 12 hours of college credit. As a result, dual-credit enrollment swelled from slightly below 80,000 students in 2008 to over 151,000 this past school year. 

This is why a draft report presented to the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board analyzing dual-credit programs in Texas from 2001 to 2015 is so disquieting. The report found that the programs have barely moved the needle on college enrollment and performance. In addition, minority and low-income students are less likely to enroll in the courses and more apt to struggle with the rigors of college work. Continue reading