Category Archives: Preschool worthless

0347_ Will Congress Heed Evidence That Government Preschool is Worthless? – by Karen Effrem, Jane Robbins – The American Spectator 7-24-18

Donna Jack
July 27, 2017

Excerpts from below:

“(1) ‘fade out’ and even reversal of positive achievement effects by grades 2-3, so that pre-K non-participants were outperforming participants; (2) more disciplinary infractions and special-education placements for pre-K participants by grade 3 than for non-participants; … ” [etc. – see below]

“This dismal report is hardly surprising. The author of the Tennessee study, Dr. Dale Farran, had said in a 2016 Brookings paper that despite 50 years of experience, research does not support the proposition that expanding pre-K will improve later achievement for low-income children.

“…parents, keep your kids out of government preschool.

__________________________________

From: Donna Garner <wgarner1@hot.rr.com>
Sent: Tuesday, July 24, 2018 12:22 PM
To: Donna Garner <wgarner1@hot.rr.com>
Subject: WILL CONGRESS HEED EVIDENCE THAT GOVERNMENT PRESCHOOL IS WORTHLESS? — BY KAREN EFFREM, JANE ROBBINS – THE AMERICAN SPECTATOR – 7.24.18

7.24.18 – American Spectator

 https://spectator.org/will-congress-heed-evidence-that-government-preschool-is-worthless/

 “Will Congress Heed Evidence That Government Preschool Is Worthless?”

By Karen Effrem, Jane Robbins

Jane Robbins is a senior fellow at American Principles Project. Dr. Karen Effrem is trained as a pediatrician and serves as president of Education Liberty Watch.

Government pre-K won’t help participants do better in school — and it will even cause emotional harm.

 On the theory that more government programs can solve any public-education problem, bipartisan policymakers have embraced government-funded pre-K programs as the current fix. The federal Every Student Succeeds Act dangles multiple incentives, including new Preschool Development Grants, to coax states into taking more young children from their families and enrolling them in government preschool. Advocates claim the $7.6 billion spent on state pre-K programs will result in improved academic achievement and a multitude of societal benefits. Continue reading